Thursday, September 26, 2019

Bookish Mewsings: After the Flood by Kassandra Montag & I Could Use a Reading Day



Along with my mini reviews, I am linking to both Book Beginnings, a meme in which readers share the first sentence of a book they are reading, hosted by Gillion Dumas of Rose City Reader and Friday 56 hosted by Freda of Freda's Voice, in which readers share a random sentence or two from page 56 or 56% of the book they are reading.


After the Flood by Kassandra Montag 
William Morrow, 2019
Fiction; 432 pgs

Book Beginnings:
Children think we make them, but we don't. They exist somewhere else, before us, before time. They come into the world and make us. They make us by breaking us first.

Friday 56 (excerpt from 56%):
A bullet splintered the trunk next to my head. I didn't turn to look; I broke into a run. 
My thoughts:
A century or so from now, floodwaters have overtaken much of the land. Coastal cities and even the much of the inlands are covered in water. People have been forced to take to the water, living on boats or in small mountain towns, the only landmasses left behind. Myra and her family had been living in Nebraska when the floodwaters came. When her husband takes off with their young daughter, Row, a pregnant Myra is heart-broken. Along with her grandfather, Myra and her youngest daughter Pearl go in search of Row—a mission that seems fruitless at the best of times. Seven years later, Mrya hears a rumor that her oldest daughter may still be alive, reigniting Myra’s determination to find and rescue her. Avoiding the raiders who steal, rape and murder is no easy task. Myra reluctantly joins forces with a group of other travelers who are seeking out a place to form a community when there seems no other choice. Life has taught her to trust no one, even the kindness of strangers.

Earlier this week news headlines read: "UN Report on Earth's Oceans Confirms The Catastrophe Is Already Unfolding Around Us":
Hundred-year floods will become an annual occurrence by 2050 in some cities and small island nations, according to the IPCC. Several of those cities are in the United States, including its second largest, Los Angeles.
It makes novels like After the Flood all the more frightening. Such a seemingly worst cast scenario and impossible idea does not seem all that far-fetched after all.

Initially I found myself having to take the occasional break from this novel because of the apparent hopelessness of Myra’s and Pearl’s situation. Kassandra Montag’s world seems so real and vivid. I loved Pearl’s wild-ness, spirit, and her unique take on life. Myra is fierce and protective. She has had to numb herself to the anger, desperation, and pain of the past and the present in order to survive—and keep Pearl alive. She is tough and hard. She is teaching Pearl to be the same, including how to best survive in their current environment. It was impossible not to feel for both Myra and Pearl. I admired Myra for her strength and fortitude and could relate to her need and desire to protect her children. But at what cost? Was Myra’s obsession with finding her lost child causing her to overlook the child she had in her care? And what do we lose when we close ourselves off emotionally? I did not always agree with Myra’s choices, but I could understand why she made them. And as much as I wanted to reach through the pages and give Pearl a hug, I imagine she would not have found it comforting.

As the novel is written from the perspective of Myra, the reader has a limited view into most of the other characters lives, which is the cost of a first person narrative. I think this novel was best told in that perspective, however, I would not have minded more of a glimpse into their lives as well. Each of those characters has their own story and has found a way to survive, both emotionally and physically in this world they now live in.  But then, it was not really their story.

After the Flood was an interesting mix of literary fiction and suspense. While at moments in the beginning I thought of McCarty’s The Road, by the middle I was thinking of The Walking Dead (but this one without the zombies). Of course, After the Flood is its own book and completely different—don’t let my comparisons fool you. Overall, I enjoyed After the Flood quite a bit.


Does this sound like something you would enjoy reading? Have you read After the Flood


Every Friday Coffee Addicted Writer from Coffee Addicted Writer poses a question which participants respond on their own blogs within the week (Friday through Thursday). They then share their links at the main site and visit other participants blogs.

Have you ever wished that there were official government bookish holidays, and that, by law, employers HAD to give their workers a paid day off? If so, what kind of bookish holiday would you like to have?

My employer would probably argue that I do receive paid vacation and can use those days however I want, including as reading days. I know not everyone is so lucky. Now, if we did have a mandated reading for leisure day, I wouldn't argue with that. It would give me an excuse to spend the day with my books without the guilt of all the usual work and life obligations hanging over my head. Maybe. Although, if it was a national holiday, it would mean school would be out and the chances of me being able to read all day (or even half a day) would be slim. Seriously though, I often wish there were more hours in a day for reading. And for blogging, for that matter.


 I hope you all have a wonderful weekend! Be sure and tell me what you are reading and are up to!


© 2019, Musings of a Bookish Kitty. All Rights Reserved. If you're reading this on a site other than Musings of a Bookish Kitty or Wendy's feed, be aware that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.

36 comments:

  1. The reading day idea reminds me of Google giving their employees one day a week to work on a non-job related project. And of a book I just read, which argues that deep play is a form of rest that can help improve productivity.

    In other words, scheduling time off for employees to learn or take a good break can actually help employers.

    I'd be up for a reading day or just short breaks to learn something new

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    1. Eustacia - That would be the way to go, I think. Considering I work for the government, I doubt that will ever be an option though. I like the idea of time off to learn something new or work on a non-job related project and not just limiting it to reading. That would open it up to everyone, including those who may not like to read. Thank you for visiting!

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  2. After the Flood does sound like something that could happen. I don't usually go for books like that but something about this one appeals to me.

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    1. Kathy - Recent headlines certainly make it seem possible! If you do read it, I hope you like it. Thank you for stopping by.

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  3. I'm planning to read this novel and appreciate your thoughts on it.

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    1. Catherine - I hope you enjoy it! I'll be curious to know what you think. Thank you for visiting!

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  4. I'd hate a bookish holiday. I just wouldn't want to do what I was expected to do thus wouldn't want to read. Plus, not everyone is a reader so I don't feel like it should be something that employers fund, you know? Lots of other things that would be more useful... No matter how much I love reading!

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    1. Nicci - Yeah, it really wouldn't be fair to those who do not enjoy reading. I like Google's idea that Eustacia mentioned of giving employees one day a week to work on non-job related projects. I don't think a designated reading day would bother me, but I can see where you are coming from. It's like my making a list of TBR books for a challenge and then suddenly wanting to read every book not on the list instead. Thank you for stopping by!

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  5. Pretty intense and intriguing 56!! Happy weekend!

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    1. Freda - It definitely had some intense moments! Thank you for visiting!

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  6. I have After the Flood on my list. I've read (skimmed, because I don't want to know too much) several reviews and the topic interests me.

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    1. Jenclair - I will be curious to read your thoughts on After the Flood. Thank you for stopping by!

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  7. I think I'd like After the Flood. I'm a sucker for dystopian worlds.

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    1. Lark - I think you might like it. Thank you for visiting!

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  8. Those snippets really pulled me in. I hadn't seen this book before, but I'll definitely be on the lookout for it now. Hope you have a great weekend! :)

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    1. Ashley - I hope you like it if you give it a try. Have a great weekend too!

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  9. What a great sounding book! Funny to read about it here, I heard about it earlier this week. Definitely on my TBR.

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    1. Kwizgiver - I hope you enjoy it when you read it! Thank you for stopping by.

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  10. I've seen this book around, so it was interesting to hear your thoughts on it.

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  11. I've been hearing lots of good things about After the Flood. I'm waiting for my library to get a hold of this book. Then again, I'll have to wait in line should the other readers got it before me, ha.

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    1. Melody - I hope your library gets a copy soon! Not that you don't have a lot of other books to read already . . . :-) Thank you for visiting!

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  12. interesting cover and great teases. sounds good to me
    sherry @ fundinmental

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  13. After the Flood sounds like a really interesting read and certainly something that seems possible.

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    1. Suzanne - It was a good one. Thank you for stopping by!

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  14. After the Flood sounds like a heavy read and like something that could really happen. I know books like this can be draining, I read The Road years back as well.
    Great review!

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    1. Naida - Thank you! I think the real life headlines are what make it seem possible. Hopefully it isn't? I really liked the end.

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  15. After the Flood sounds like something that I would really like. If only I could read all the books that I want to read! I would vote for a few extra hours tacked onto every day!

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    1. Carole - I know what you mean. There are just too many good sounding books out there. Thank you for visiting!

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  16. I think I would need to be in the right frame of mind for something like After The Flood, as good as it sounds.

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    1. Verushka - Yes, I know I do better with this type of book when I'm in a certain mood. I do think it's worth reading. Thank you for stopping by!

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  17. After the Flood looks outstanding and I can't WAIT to read it. For some reason I've been really interested in climate change type dystopias lately- maybe because we seem to be in the midt of one lol, as you alluded to. Anyway- glad this was good!

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    1. Greg - I hope you enjoy it when you read it, Greg. It does sometimes seem like we are in the middle of a climate change dystopia, doesn't it? Thank you for visiting!

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  18. That book sounds to real for me to make it through without having a nervous breakdown :)

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    1. Stacy - It had its realistic moments. :-) I think the first half that felt like it was right out of the headlines. Thank you for stopping by!

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