Monday, April 04, 2016

Where Is Your Bookmark? (04/05/2016)

For years I have wanted to read Scottsboro by Ellen Feldman, but have yet to do so (I'm sure many of you can relate to not yet managing to read a book you've set your eye on). Terrible Virtue intriged the history lover in me, and so I jumped at the chance to read and review it when the opportunity arose. It is a novel about the life of Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood. It seems a relevant book given recent political attacks against the organization, even if a fictional account of Sanger's life. More so though, it's an important time in our history. A time when it was considered pornographic to talk about menstration and female contraception. A time when women, one of them being Margaret Sanger, found the courage to speak out.




Every Tuesday Diane from Bibliophile By the Sea First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros, where participants share the first paragraph (or a few) of a book they are reading or thinking about reading soon. It is also where I share my first impressions about the book I am sharing.
Once, on a train going God knows where, to give still another speech, I awakened in the middle of the night nauseated. Oh, no, I couldn't be pregant. To calm myself, I raised the shade of the window above my berth and looked out. I was just in time to see the sign marking the station fly by. CORNING. Even after all those years, merely passing through the town could make me sick to my stomach.
I can't remember a time that I didn't dream of escape. When the neighborhood brats made fun of me, I told myself I'd show them someday. When Miss Graves drove me out of school, I swore I'd never return. How old was I then? Fifteen? Sixteen? 

Every Tuesday, Jenn from Books And A Beat hosts Teaser Tuesdays at which time participants grab their current read, open to a random page, and share two (2) "teaser" sentences from that page while avoiding any spoilers.


Teaser from 17% of Terrible Virtue:
Without it I might not have had the courage to speak up. not that I drank much that night or any other, at least at that stage of my life. Children of drunks rarely do, unless they're drunks themselves.
and at 42%:
As I sat staring down at the paper splattered with war news as gory as blood, I knew one thing for certain. There is no such thing as a martyr without an audience.
What do you think? Would you keep reading?  

The opening prologue's first paragraph was too long to share, and so I went with the first two paragraphs of Chapter One. I was drawn into Feldman's novel immediately, wanting to know more about who this woman was, what her story was. While I haven't always been able to relate to her, I could see a bit of myself in the opening paragraph.


What are you reading at the moment?  Is it anything you would recommend?


© 2016, Wendy Runyon of Musings of a Bookish Kitty. All Rights Reserved. If you're reading this on a site other than Musings of a Bookish Kitty or Wendy's feed, be aware that this post has been stolen and is used without permission.

62 comments:

  1. Yes I would keep reading! - that is some violent reaction to her home town, there must be a reason behind it?

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    1. Cleo - It makes you wonder, doesn't it? She couldn't wait to get out of there.

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  2. Wow that is an intense reaction to her hometown! That alone makes me more curious- it looks like a very interesting read!

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    1. Greg - It is very interesting. Sanger was an interesting woman. I can't say I always agreed with decisions she made in her personal life, but she did so much for women's health.

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  3. Love the opening. I have this on my TBR list.

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    1. Heather - I hope you enjoy it when you get to it!

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  4. That books is high, high, high on my list!

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    1. Beth - I will look forward to your thoughts on this one!

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  5. Interesting teasers--currently reading "Salt to the Sea" about refugees fleeing during WWII. Just finished recently WHAT WAS MINE by Helen Ross--both my husband and I highly recommend it.

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    1. Karen and Gerard - I really want to read Salt to the Sea. What Was Mine sounds good too! I am glad you both enjoyed it.

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  6. Yes, I would read more. Sounds like an interesting character. My teaser is from Quick and the Dead, a mystery.

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    1. Laura - She really is. I have already started researching the woman on my own to see how much of the novel is true. I just can't help myself. :-)

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  7. Doesn't sound like a book for me, but I am curious as to why she is returning to a place she couldn't wait to leave. :-)
    sherry @ fundinmental My TT

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    1. Sherry - I imagine not everyone would like this one. I'm finding it fascinating though. Sanger is such an interesting woman.

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  8. Sounds like an interesting read. Glad you were able to make time for it :)

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    1. JoAnn - It's not the book I intended to read first in April, but I have no regrets. It's good so far. :-)

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  9. I like it! I would keep reading. (don't you wish we had an extra day in the week just for reading everything we want?)

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    1. Debbie - I do! An extra day just for reading would be wonderful. Think of the books we could read!

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  10. I would keep reading that one for sure. I can't wait to see what you think.

    I'm reading Beyond Belief and it's just okay.

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    1. Kathy - I'm enjoying it so far. It's actually quite a compelling book!

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  11. I would keep reading! This book looks fascinating.

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  12. Sounds like a really interesting books! The cover has caught my eye a few times but I had no idea what it was about. You're right -- it's a very timely read!

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    1. Lindsay - I really like the cover too. I am glad I decided to read this one.

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  13. I think I'd keep reading, at least for a while. :)

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    1. Jenclair - I admit to being a little surprised at how swept up in Terrible Virtue I've been. It's been hard to put down at times. I'm really curious to know more about the real Margaret Sanger. She and I wouldn't have seen eye to eye on certain issues (lifestyle choices, mainly), but she did so much for women's health.

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  14. I love Feldman's books, so I downloaded this one right away. I am also interested in the historical events that led to Planned Parenthood, etc. In the 70s, I volunteered at Planned Parenthood after my regular work hours. In my day job, I saw too many young women burdened with more children than they could handle.

    Don't let me get on my soapbox about how the political winds seem to be blowing backwards to times we should never revisit. Times with no choices.

    That's it, that's my rant. I can't wait to read this one. Thanks for sharing...and for visiting my blog.

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    1. Laurel-Rain - We can stand on that soapbox together. :-) My poor husband has had to listen to me rant as I've been reading Terrible Virtue. That's so great that you were able to volunteer your time to Planned Parenthood that way.

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  15. That opening definitely grabbed me. This sounds like a book I'd enjoy on many levels -- one I'd read more than once. Thank you for introducing me to this author.
    Thanks, too, for stopping by my blog and taking the time to leave a comment.
    Sandy @ TEXAS TWANG

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    1. Sandra - I can see myself coming back to Terrible Virtue as well. And it's a book I can see wanting to keep on my shelf for my daughter to read someday.

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  16. I want to read this, just based on what you've shared above, my first time hearing about this title, or author. It sounds... powerful, despite being fictionalized, and hopefully will make a statement with younger (female) readers.

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    1. Rita - I'm nearly done with the book now and so far can recommend it. Margaret Sanger is such an interesting person. We've come so far when you think about it.

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  17. You had me at Margaret Sanger. She's one of my heroes. This book goes to the top of the list for me.

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    1. Catherine - I can see why she's one of your heroes! We women--and men--have a lot to thank her for. I hope you enjoy it if you read it!

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  18. This is definitely not my cup of tea at all, as I am a firm believer in pro-life values. What I do know about Margaret Sanger I have gotten from Wikipedia.

    As a pro-life feminist, I do agree with Sanger on the necessity of birth control, but I am totally against abortion, except in cases in which the mother's life is in danger. Birth control is fine as long as it does not function as an early abortion.

    Thanks for commenting on my own Tuesday Intros post!! :)

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    1. Maria - I imagine this book wouldn't be for everyone. I can see how it might be uncomfortable for some. I can't say I have gotten a pro-abortion vibe at all from this book. More so, it's a look at the conditions women faced back then, the lack of proper education and services available to them in regards to their general health. And why clinics like Planned Parenthood became so important--not for abortions as some associate them with today--but just providing a wide variety of medical treatments to women including contraceptives, especially to those who can't afford it. Sanger's desire to legalize contraceptives was in part to avoid women having to get abortions--or perform them on themselves, which some women ended up doing out of desperation.

      Thank you for your comment!

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  19. What a very powerful opening/teaser - yes, I'd read on. She certainly sounds like a really fascinating woman with a dark past. My TT this week is all about running away from demons - https://sjhigbee.wordpress.com/2016/04/05/teaser-tuesday-5th-april-2016/

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    1. Sarah - She is fascinating. I don't think she and I would have gotten along if I'd known her at the time, but I appreciate the work she did advocating for women.

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  20. Seems to be quite a bit of heavy reading being done by some participants this week. My teaser is from a much lighter read in the cozy mystery genre...a book by Nancy Atherton. It can be found at http://abookaddictsview.blogspot.com/2016/04/teaser-tuesday.html

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    1. Abookaddict - It did seem that there were a number of heavier or darker books being read this week. I am glad you featured something lighter. I think I'll be up for something light soon.

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  21. I think I would keep reading this one. I'm definitely intrigued. While I know the name I know very little about the actual woman and how she made things happen. I hope you enjoy it!

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    1. Katherine - Her self-proclaimed title of rebel is a fitting one. :-) I finished the book tonight, and ended up spending part of the evening doing some research.

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  22. This is a new book to me. I like what you shared. I'm going to go find this book.

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    1. Margot - It is definitely an interesting book. Although it is fiction, it reads much like a memoir (although some might argue most memoirs are fiction too . . . )

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  23. I know nothing about Margaret Sanger so this sounds rather interesting to me. I feel like I should know something about her. I liked the sound of the parts that you shared so I would definitely keep going.

    Carole @ Carole's Random Life

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    1. Carole - I hadn't really known much about her before either, although now I do. I couldn't help but research the woman after finishing the book.

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  24. You're right. The timing is terrific to read this one. Hope you enjoy it. Here's Mine

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    1. Paulita - Yes, it's very timely. It's a little scary how some politicians want to turn back the clock.

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  25. Yes, I'd keep reading it. It sounds very intense!

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    1. Melody - It was a very interesting read, Melody.

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  26. Hmm, sounds pretty intense! Not sure if this is my type of book, but I'm definitely intrigued. Hope you're enjoying it!

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    1. Cyn - I wasn't sure this book would be for me, but I couldn't resist after reading what it was about. I thought it would be worth taking a chance on--and it was.

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  27. I would definitely keep reading, this sounds fascinating.

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  28. I would definitely keep reading, just based on that! I'm really intrigued about this one anyway :)

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    1. Annika - I definitely think it's worth reading if you get the chance!

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  29. Those bits definitely sound like something I'd keep reading because of.

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  30. That's a great opening. Can you imagine being driven out of town by a teacher?! I guess, I'm assuming that was a teacher. Ok, you've got us hooked!

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    1. Iliana - I can't imagine! It was a little more than that, but I can understand why she felt the need to leave.

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